Dealing With Your Dirt: Life Lessons From the Daffodil

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I have noticed a lot of spring blooms around town this past week and this makes my heart so happy! Fruit trees are bursting with pink and white blossoms, while spring bulbs are poking their little heads through the soil, reaching for warmth from the sun once again. I enjoy seeing God’s creation come to life after being dormant for so many months. The riotous color produced in spring is always revitalizing and refreshing as it follows the cold, dreary days of winter.

One of the spring flowers that I have always admired is the daffodil. Daffodils are typically the first of the spring bulbs to pop up in the garden and are often associated with renewal and new beginnings. Their cheery little yellow and white faces remind us all that life continues moving forward, even after difficult seasons. There have been many Springs where I have seen fully grown daffodils continue to thrive, even with a little spring snow around their feet. Daffodils are eager, strong, and resilient.

In order to have daffodils spring up in your garden, you must plant them in the fall. Daffodils are bulbs that stay in the ground all winter long and then begin the entry into spring for all the other flowers. There are some lessons that we can learn from our friend, the daffodil:

1. Prepare the bulbs for planting.

Daffodils get planted in the fall roughly two to four weeks before the first freeze. It’s the time when the leaves are falling and the sun still warms the ground. Once planted, the bulbs have the chance to settle into their new environment before experiencing the cold of winter. The cold then sparks a process that actually helps them flower. The same is true of us in our own journeys with Christ. When times are good and life is smooth, we should study the bible and hide His word in our heart (Psalm 119:11). Through our study of His word on the good days, our hearts will be better prepared to trust in His truths and be strengthened on the hard days. Because let’s face it, when the difficult days arrive, it’s hard to keep perspective and understanding. But if we rely on what we learned before the difficulties arose, and then allow God to use our struggles to draw us closer to Him, a process happens in us that causes our faith to grow even stronger—all because we allowed ourselves to be prepared to bloom.

2. Cover them with mulch to protect from frostbite.

Just as we cover our daffodil bulbs with mulch for protection, we need to cover ourselves with the power of prayer. So often we pray for the needs of everyone else around us, but neglect to draw power from our Savior into our own lives. Do not feel selfish in praying for yourself...you need it as much as everyone else! Remember that Jesus prayed for himself, too (John 17:5). If you haven’t spent much time in prayer or would like help developing a deeper prayer life, try picking up The Prayer Dare by Ron Kincaid or The Power of a Praying (mom, parent, wife, etc) books by Stormie Omartian. These books will help give focus and direction in your prayer life. Prayer will help take you deeper in your faith and will guard your heart as the evil one tries to lead you astray on your darkest days.

3. Allow them to be dormant over winter.

One of the hardest things for us as women to do is to rest. Be still. Our minds are constantly whirling with to-do lists not just for us, but for our jobs and our families too. We transition from one activity to another until we are exhausted. When you add difficult circumstances on top of all that activity, something is going to have to give. And most often it is our emotional state of being. Instead of piling on guilt during these times, give yourself permission to rest. You are not being lazy. You are rejeuvenating your soul to continue to be the woman God called you to be. Rest in His goodness to provide the needs for your family when you cannot meet them all. Rest in His grace as he restores your balance and outlook on life. Rest in His love as he takes you deeper in your faith by surrendering  control of your life.

4. Turn your face to the sun.

As you journey through life, abide with Jesus. John 15:9 says, “Just as the Father has loved me, I have also loved you; abide in my love.” Abide means to dwell with. Jesus wants us to abide with and look him! He doesn’t look at us begrudgingly or get tired of us coming to him. He lovingly draws us to himself. When difficulties arise, we must turn our faces toward the light that is Jesus and not let negative thoughts control us. Instead of looking inward and thinking, “I can’t…” or “I don’t have the strength to…,” turn fully to Jesus and remember you have the power of Christ dwelling inside of you (Romans 8:10)! Rest in the promise of Lamentations 3:22-23, “Because of the LORD’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.”

5. Share your beauty with others.

Once you have weathered your journey and made it to the other side of your suffering, be willing to share your story with others. We all need encouragement in difficult circumstances, especially from those who have walked similar roads and kept their eyes on Jesus. Be vulnerable enough to allow others to see the beauty that God created in you during your difficult season—it will give them needed hope! Isaiah 48:10 tells us that God refines us through testing in the “furnace of affliction.” When you reach the end of your affliction, look back and see God’s hand throughout your journey. Once you do, you will want to share your beautiful story of God’s grace with anyone that will listen!


 
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Meet the Author!

Kim Arnold has been a church member of Council Road Baptist Church for nearly 25 years. She teaches private piano lessons in her studio and at Mid-America Christian University. Her passion lies in training up the next generation of worship leaders. Kim and her husband Jason have been married for 17 years and have a 12-year old son, Nolan.

 

Kim Arnold

Kim Arnold has been a church member of Council Road Baptist Church for nearly 25 years. She teaches private piano lessons in her studio and at Mid-America Christian University. Her passion lies in training up the next generation of worship leaders. Kim and her husband Jason have been married for 17 years and have a 12-year old son, Nolan.